A review of nickel and dimed on not getting by in america a book by barbara ehrenreich

Nickel and Dimed is an accessible yet relentless look at the lives of the American underclass. Upon obtaining a job, Ehrenrich had to buy appropriate clothing generally slacks and polo shirts and travel to work and back. Finally, having prepared a catalog of the primary forms of social inequality in the two societies, how would you compare the two societies with respect to their patterns of social inequality?

She also chose to live in a couple of hotels granted, they weren't the Ritz and turned down a more lucrative job because she didn't want to work 11 hours per day.

Describe briefly how the relevant groups are unequal for each type. No one since H. Ehrenreich experienced remarkable goodwill, generosity, and solidarity among her colleagues.

Sunday, June 19, Review of "Nickel and Dimed: I'll bet they would have suggested the nearest thrift store where the same slacks could have been purchased for a few dollars. But by not taking advantage of, nor explaining, all of the opportunities that exist to make it less difficult, she seems to be stacking the deck in her disfavor, which, in turn, suits her political position.

For each kind of inequality you have selected an example where inequality is high and another where it is low. Instead of a factual account, she writes the book almost from this ivory tower perspective that I found not only annoying but insulting. The idea of "indirect relationships" refers to ways that the advantaged or disadvantaged influence the circumstances or actions of those who are differently situated without direct interaction, e.

In the wake of recent welfare reform measures, millions of women entering the workforce can expect to face struggles like the ones Ehrenreich confronted in Nickel and Dimed. But even more, she is a completely atomized being with no family and no friends.

BKMT READING GUIDES

She had no children in tow for this 'experiment', nor a husband or extended family. Despite the life-or-death seriousness of the subject matter, Nickel and Dimed is fast-paced and funny. One of her main problems is the cost of rent--which must be recognized as a significant problem for a society that expects people to be able to afford living quarters near the hot economies that are producing jobs.

Take out just because you have no fridge or microwave available? One big difference is that people with enough money can afford to make bad decisions.

One of the maids, Rosalie, is a teenager who can only afford to eat a snack-size bag of Doritos to fuel her eight-hour workday. Do you think Ehrenreich's experience would be different in today's economy? You also were surprised that the aforementioned coworkers were neither impressed nor appreciative that you turned out to be a wealthy, highly educated person writing a book about how hard it is to be a poor person.

Maybe working as a waitress is kind of fun and interesting and not too stressful if you know you'll only be doing it until you get bored. During her experiment Ehrenreich worked as a waitress; a caregiver for Alzheimer's patients; a hotel maid; a house cleaner; and a Wal-Mart ladies-wear employee.

People are unequal in every conceivable way in endless circumstances, both immediate and enduring, by both objective criteria and subjective experience. As hard as it was for Rosalie and Holly and the others in Nickel and Dimed, its likely that for many Americans, things have gotten much worse.

I say, read this book with a critical eye and you will get a lot of benefit out of it. Ehrenreich describes the various places she lived, most of which were ratty, uncomfortable, minimalist, and sometimes dangerous. This brave and frank book is ultimately a challenge to create a less divided society.

I didn't totally hate this book, though it left me with a bad taste in my mouth. Do not worry about why such inequality exists.Jun 19,  · Review of "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America" by Barbara Ehrenreich Welfare reform in the mids was meant to get people off the welfare rolls and into the workforce.

As the U.S. had a strong economy at the time, and jobs were plentiful, this was supposed to. Barbara Ehrenreich is the author of Nickel and Dimed, Blood Rites, The Worst Years of Our Lives (a New York Times bestseller), Fear of Falling, which was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, and several other books.

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Nickel and Dimed reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity--a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate stratagems for survival. Instantly acclaimed for its insight, humor, and passion, this book is changing the way America perceives its working poor.

Barbara Ehrenreich (/ ˈ ɛər ən r aɪ k /; born August 26, ) is an American author and political activist who describes herself as "a myth buster by trade" and has been called "a veteran muckraker" by The New Yorker. During the s and early s she was a prominent figure in the Democratic Socialists of bigskyquartet.com is a widely read and.

Nickel and Dimed reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity — a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate strategies for survival. Instantly acclaimed for its insight, humor, and passion, this book is changing the way America perceives its working poor.

Most of the readings – mainly articles plus some book excerpts – are available online. The list includes direct links to the online versions of all these references.

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A review of nickel and dimed on not getting by in america a book by barbara ehrenreich
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